18 Mind-Blowing Glass Marbles!

18. 1.211″ by James Daschbach. Glass marble extraordinaire James Daschbach has been working with glass for over 15 years, and is widely recognized for his out-of-this-world, galaxy-like borosilicate marbles.  He currently resides in Washington.

Source: James Daschbach.

Source: James Daschbach. All photos © their respective owners with permission granted for this blog post unless otherwise noted.

1.211" For sale jamesdaschbach.bigcartel.com

A post shared by James Daschbach (@james_daschbach) on

 

17. Truce Colors by Andrew Brown Studios. Carved using the battuto technique, this gorgeous marble is the ultimate play between color and texture.  Andrew Brown graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration from the Savannah College of Art Design in 1998, and then relocated to Albuquerque, NM, where he began his rewarding and innovative career making glass art.

Source: Andrew Brown Studios.

Source: Andrew Brown Studios.

Source: Andrew Brown Studios.

Source: Andrew Brown Studios.

16. Opal Basket by Raj Kommineni.  Sandblasted, faceted, and featuring a perfectly-positioned opal, this brilliant artwork was created by Raj Kommineni.  Raj was born and raised in Massachusetts, and was introduced to glass paperweights at a young age.  Furthering his glass fascination and education, he was exposed to the contemporary flameworking movement, attended UMASS, and was able to apprentice and work with some incredible glass artists. By 2002, he was a full time glass artist, and established his own studio in 2004.

Source: Raj Kommineni.

Source: Raj Kommineni.

15. Water Garden by Jared DeLong. Incorporating both hot and cold working into his work, Jared DeLong is constantly raising the bar in fine art marbles.  Born in the Santa Cruz Mountains, he was introduced to glass at an early age, working alongside his mother cutting stained glass.  Since then, he has worked with and for many influential glass artists.  In 2000, he relocated to Trinidad, California, where he currently resides, to establish Lost Coast Glass.

Source: Jared DeLong.

Source: Jared DeLong.

Source: Jared DeLong.

Source: Jared DeLong.

14. Safari Sunsets by Kaj Beck. Part of the sensational Sunset Series, glass artist Kaj Beck created this marble masterpiece.  In 1996, he started working with glass with Dave Clark III and Mike Warren in Humboldt County.  Around 1998, he relocated to San Diego and worked with Rob Bessone, and shortly after met legendary artist Josh Sable.  After several years in San Diego, he moved shop north to Boulder Creek, where he currently resides.

Source: Kaj Beck.

Source: Kaj Beck / Glass ORBits.

Source: Kaj Beck.

Source: Kaj Beck / Glass ORBits.

Source: Kaj Beck.

Source: Kaj Beck / Glass ORBits.

13. Cherry Blossoms by Akihiro Okama. World-renowned fine artist Akihiro Okama has taught many artists in his home studio based in Nara, Japan, and his father was also a famous glassworker in Japan.  Akihiro’s cherry blossom marbles are becoming increasingly rare, this one from 2008 or 2009, and made with satake glass.  Available work is released through Jon Green, Contemporary Glass Art Dealer.

Source: Akihiro Okama.

Source: Akihiro Okama.

12. Dichroic Marble by James Alloway.  Made with soft glass, this incredible dichroic marble by Portland-based artist James Alloway is ravishing and awe-inspiring.  He often incorporates dichroic and cane work into his creations, producing incredibly vibrant and playful marble designs.

Source: James Alloway.

Source: James Alloway.

Source: James Alloway.

Source: James Alloway.

11. Zipper Head by Tim Keyzers.  This stunning marble by glass genius Tim Keyzers features a fumed skull, double opal center vortex, and an electroformed copper zipper.  Keyzers currently resides in Washington.

Source: Tim Keyzers.

Source: Tim Keyzers / Glass ORBits.

Source: Tim Keyzers.

Source: Tim Keyzers / Glass ORBits.

10. Kobuki Rose by John Kobuki.  Artist and educator John Kobuki’s glass passion was ignited in 1995 and has been moving full-force since.  He is known for making marbles with the compression technique. His work has been featured nationally and internationally, and has done demonstrations for the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass.

Source: John Kobuki.

Source: John Kobuki.

9. Hiroshima Castle by Daniel Benway & John Kobuki. Based in Humboldt County, California, Daniel Benway has been working with borosilicate glass since 1995, and in 1998 shifted his focus to fine art marbles.  He also has extensive experience with murrine making, obvious in the below marble which he created using his breathtaking Hiroshima Castle murrine in collaboration with John Kobuki.

Source: Daniel Benway / John Kobuki.

Source: Daniel Benway / John Kobuki.

8. The Bright Side by Richard Hollingshead II. Richard C.Hollingshead II was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma and began working with glass in 2000. Richard consistently strives to create some of the best glass marbles on the market today by incorporating new and innovative techniques into his work.

Source: Richard Hollingshead II.

Source: Richard Hollingshead II.

Source: Richard Hollingshead II.

Source: Richard Hollingshead II.

7. Opal Conduit by Travis Weber.  Travis Weber is undoubtedly one of the best marble makers of all time.  In 1997 he began lampworking, and in 2005 shifted his focus to making contemporary marbles made with borosilicate.  His designs are cutting-edge and evolutionary.  He is constantly pushing himself to create original, high quality artwork.

Source: Travis Weber.

Source: Travis Weber.

Source: Travis Weber.

Source: Travis Weber.

 

6. Rainbow Reticello by Josh Sable.  This impressive 72 line reticello marble features 17 murrini of four different patterns, and was created by marble mastermind, Josh Sable of San Diego, California.

Source: Josh Sable.

Source: Josh Sable.

Source: Josh Sable.

Source: Josh Sable.

Source: Josh Sable.

Source: Josh Sable.

5. Blue White Waves Sphere by Nao Saito.  Nao Saito is a Japanese artist from Osaka who makes networked borosilicate glass spheres with well-thought-out patterns and color selection.  Available work is released through Jon Green, Contemporary Glass Art Dealer.

Source: Nao Saito.

Source: Nao Saito.

4. Death Star by Nathan Gorman.  Nathan Snyder melted the glass into the marble form and Nathan Gorman carved it to detail.  It came to Gorman as a smooth sphere, with black through the center and surface fuming on the outside.  Though he works with glass every day, he stays off the heat and instead pursues a variety of cold working techniques to bring out incredible detail.

Source: Nathan Gorman / Nathan Snyder.

3. Getting Complex by Takao Miyake. Another powerful artistic force coming out of Japan is Takao Miyake aka Chandra. Miyake creates remarkably complex and detailed glasswork, including an innovative type of retticello comprised of multitudinous dots and imploded fuming. Available work is released through Jon Green, Contemporary Glass Art Dealer.

Source: Takao Miyake.

Source: Takao Miyake.

Source: Takao Miyake.

Source: Takao Miyake.

2. 40 Year Murrini by Ro Purser.  Ro Purser is an American glass pioneer who started making glass art in the late 1960s.  In 1973, he became the first of the American Contemporary Art Glass Movement to EVER make a marble.  Forty years later, his passion for glass art remains relentless.  The special 40 Year Murrini marbles represent his progression as a glass artist over the past four decades, and contain some of the first murrini he ever made.

Source: Ro Purser.

Source: Ro Purser.

1. The Eight by Yoshinori Kondo. Yoshinori Kondo is an exceptionally skilled glass artist from Japan.  He began lampworking with soft glass in 2001, and borosilicate in 2002. In 2013, he teamed up with Junichi Kojima and Daisuke Saito to form Team Japan for the flame-off at the Treating Yourself Expo in Toronto, Canada. Available work is released through Jon Green, Contemporary Glass Art Dealer.

Source: Yoshinori Kondo.

Source: Yoshinori Kondo.

Source: Yoshinori Kondo.

Source: Yoshinori Kondo.

 

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