15 Truly Amazing Glass Beadmakers

15. Floral Beads by Gems in Bloom.  Canadian artist Jacqueline Parkes creates vibrant lampworked glass beads with beautiful detail.  She also has developed well-written lampwork tutorials that are easy to follow with ample information.

Source: Jacqueline Parkes.

Source: Jacqueline Parkes. All photos © their respective owners with permission granted for this blog post unless otherwise noted.

14. Mermaid by Michaela Klamert. Michaela Klamert is a full time glass artist from Vienna.  She specializes in making hollow beads, pendants, and necklaces.

Source: Michaela Klamert.

Source: Michaela Klamert.

13. Victoria by Angie Ramey. This gorgeous glass bead by Angie Ramey, a lampwork beadmaker, metal worker and jewelry designer. It boasts three-petaled flowers and metallic accents, finished with a triple stack of sterling silver bead caps.

Source: Angie Ramey.

Source: Angie Ramey.

12. Water Lily Bead by Cornelia Lentze.  Based in Vienna, Austria, glass artist Cornelia Lentze crafts divine glass beads, most notably to resemble water lilies.

Source: Cornelia Lentze.

Source: Cornelia Lentze.

11. Spiny Knotted Bracelets by Stephanie Sersich.  Stephanie Sersich creates fibrous jewelry and handmade glass beads.  Art and mixed media have been a continuous passion of hers, and she studied metalsmithing and painting in college.  Her signature jewelry incorporates her own lampwork beads, vintage glass, ethnic beads, natural materials and fibers.

Source: Stephanie Sersich.

Source: Stephanie Sersich.

10. Tequila Sunset by Kandice Seeber.  Kandice Seeber creates lampworked beads with colorful soft glass in Washington.  She became interested in beading when she for at a fabric store during her college years, and fell in love with making her own beads and color exploration.  For well over a decade, she has been in business online selling exquisite artisan beads and jewelry.

Source: Kandice Seeber.

Source: Kandice Seeber.

9. Berry Beads by Elizabeth Johnson.  Elizabeth Johnson began working with glass around 1990, beginning with stained glass, and later shifted her focus to flameworking to create life-like fruit and berries from glass.  Inspirations that have influenced her work include the natural surroundings of her childhood in New England, the Blaschka Glass Flowers at Harvard, and realistic glass insects by international glass master Vittorio Costantini on a trip to Murano.

Source: Elizabeth Johnson.

Source: Elizabeth Johnson.

Source: Elizabeth Johnson.

Source: Elizabeth Johnson.

8. Duo Bead by Lisa Atchison.  Lisa Atchison is an Indiana Artisan who began making lampworked beads in 2003.  Nature significantly influences her work, striving for a soft, elegant organic style.  She often incorporates copper electroforming into her bead design.

Source: Lisa Atchison.

Source: Lisa Atchison.

7. Blue Owl Focal Bead by Kim Fields.  Michigan-based artist Kim Fields created this beautiful focal bead using soft glass and it has a vertical hole.  She creates nature-inspired jewelry and sculptures rich in color and texture.  In 1999, Kim took her first lampworking class.  Just a year later she knew she had found her calling, and left her 20 year corporate career behind to devote herself completely to jewelry and bead-making.

Source: Kim Fields.

Source: Kim Fields.

Source: Kim Fields.

Source: Kim Fields.

6. Bottecelli by Sara Sally LaGrand.  Sara Sally LaGrand is an award-winning artist and author who has been bead-making since 1996. She holds a BA in Glass Formation from Park University, and has studied glass with many gifted teachers both in America and Italy.

Source: Sara Sally LaGrand.

Source: Sara Sally LaGrand.

5. Maza Copper Bead by Holly Cooper.  Holly Cooper has been making flameworked glass beads for over 12 years, and has taught bead making both nationally and internationally.  She has a background in illustration, ceramics and textile design, and resides in Texas.

Source: Holly Cooper.

Source: Holly Cooper.

4. Twisted Raku Bead by Patty Lakinsmith.  In 2003, Patty Lakinsmith took her first bead making class, and recalls “I was terrified, and completely useless.  But there was no turning back; my curious passion for bead making was awoken and it has not slept since.”  Over a decade since, she resides in the coastal mountains of Northern California, creating phenomenal glass beads and jewelry inspired by nature.

Source: Patty Lakinsmith.

Source: Patty Lakinsmith.

3. F9 by Amy Waldman-Smith. Amy Waldman-Smith resides in Canada and began making glass beads in 2001.  Since 2003, she has repeatedly taught at the BeadFX Studio in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  Amy received the honor of 2014 Commemorative Bead Artist for the Bead and Button Show, and her work has been featured in many craft publications.

Source: Amy Waldman-Smith.

Source: Amy Waldman-Smith.

2. Big Disk Beads by Kristina Logan.  Kristina Logan is an internationally recognized artist and educator, whose work has been featured in many of the world’s top galleries and museums, including The Smithsonian, Corning Museum of Glass, and Musée du Verre de Sars-Poteries in France.

Source: Kristina Logan.

Source: Kristina Logan.

1. Unicorn Rainbow Bead by Joy Munshower.  Munshower specializes in lampworked glass beads and sculpture inspired by nature, in addition to hand-cut-and-etched ceramic and stone tiles.  With an extensive artistic background, Munshower also holds a degree in Design with an emphasis in Ceramic Studio Practices from SJSU, and a graduate degree from CSU Fresno for Sculpture.  She advocates the Beads of Courage program as well, a non-profit providing arts in medicine for children with serious illness.

Source: Joy Munshower.

Source: Joy Munshower.

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