9 Glass Artists With Remarkable Murrine And Cane Working Skills

9. Barack Obama by Lazuli Flux.  Made in 2008, before the presidential grays set in, this glass murrine depicts the 44th and current President of the United States, and the first African American to hold the office. Lazuli Flux artists Zach Jorgenson and Chelsea Bent are a husband-and-wife team based in Oregon.  Jorgenson began exploring with the glass medium over a decade ago. In 2002, he took a class with Loren Stump to learn more about murrine, and in 2004 refined his focus from lampwork sculpture to murrine, marbles, and paperweights.  Bent holds a degree in Classical Art History from the University of Arizona.

Source: Lazuli Flux.

Source: Lazuli Flux. All photos © their respective owners with permission granted for this blog post unless otherwise noted.

8. Square Fall Harvest Platter by Robert Wiener.  This exquisitely charming glass platter by Robert Wiener is part of his “Colorbar Murrine” series, in which there are approximately 100 murrine in each six inch piece fused together.  Photography by Pete Duvall.

Source: Robert Wiener / Pete Duvall.

Source: Robert Wiener / Pete Duvall.

7. Family Grouping by James Jay Martell. Martell began working with glass while still in high school in 1989.  He has worked with many artists in the Seattle area for over two decades, and his work has been showcased nationally and internationally.  In 2008, he took a job position with Glassworks, Inc., making architectural art glass castings as a production manager and designer.  Most of the pieces he made in the last year were part of a study to design pieces to evoke emotion in the viewer, from peace, tranquility, joy, hope all from using a few simple elegant shapes and different arrangements of pattern and color. The below grouping was created to signify a family or clan, all slightly different and unique, yet at the same time very similar.

Source: James Jay Martell.

Source: James Jay Martell.

Source: James Jay Martell

Source: James Jay Martell

6. Bruce Lee by Chris Juedemann. Created with sophisticated and meticulous detail, this mosaic marble is by Chris Juedemann, internationally-acclaimed and praised murrine artist. Chris and his wife Lissa began making murrine in 2002, focusing on the stringer-stack method of using extremely thin strands of glass to build up an image. Chris has been a driving force in murrine for over a decade and his work has revolutionized the art form. Available work is released through Jon Green, Contemporary Glass Art Dealer.

Source: Chris Juedemann.

Source: Chris Juedemann.

5. Osaka by Lino Tagliapietra.  Lino Tagliapietra is a Venetian glass artist born in Murano, Italy, known as “The Glass Island,” for it’s extensive history of glass making.  With several decades of glass artistry, Tagliapietra has made a tremendous mark on the industry, and is regarded as an influential leader, artist, mentor, and maestro in glass around the world.

Source: Lino Tagliapietra.

Source: Lino Tagliapietra.

Source: Lino Tagliapietra.

Source: Lino Tagliapietra.

4. Madonna of the Rocks by Loren Stump.  Remarkable glass artist and educator Loren Stump began his career over 41 years ago as a stained glass artist, and has since evolved into one of the most innovative and versatile glass artists of our time.  Self-taught Stump is widely recognized for breathtaking sliced glass “paintings” and portraits in soft glass.  Stump has worked with and taught classes in both soft and hard glasses.

Source: Loren Stump.

Source: Loren Stump.

Source: Loren Stump.

Source: Loren Stump.

3. Sphere by David Patchen. American artist David Patchen creates glass art masterpieces with vibrant colors and meticulous patterns using an advanced adaptation of ‘murrine’ a technique that was popularized in Italy but dates back to middle-eastern glass. While primarily self-taught, Patchen studied briefly with Afro Celotto, former assistant to Lino Tagliapietra and was awarded a prestigious scholarship to Pilchuck Glass School. While his work is shown internationally, Patchen resides in San Francisco and has a studio within Public Glass, the Bay Area’s center for glass art.

Source: David Patchen.

Source: David Patchen.

Source: David Patchen.

Source: David Patchen.

2. Passarine by Layne Rowe.  Layne Rowe’s “Passarine” collection invents entirely new ways of approaching cane work, made using cane roll-ups around a blown form, cutting and polishing to create an innovative woven-glass effect that is rich in detail.  A renowned artist in his own right, Rowe has worked with Peter Layton at the London Glassblowing for over 15 years on and off.  Having visited London Glassblowing myself, it is a must-see studio and gallery in the artistic neighborhood of Bermondsey.

Source: Layne Rowe / London Glassblowing. Photo: Ester Segarra.

Source: Layne Rowe / London Glassblowing. Photo: Ester Segarra.

Source: Layne Rowe / London Glassblowing. Photo: Ester Segarra.

Source: Layne Rowe / London Glassblowing. Photo: Ester Segarra.

 

1. Hurricane Lemon Puffer by Stephen Rolfe Powell.  Internationally-acclaimed artist and educator Stephen Rolfe Powell was born in Birmingham, Alabama.  In 1974, he earned his Bachelor’s of Arts in Painting and Ceramics from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky.  He was an art instructor for several years before attending Louisiana State University, where he earned his Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics in 1983.  Since 1983, Powell has been making a significant impact as a professor at Centre College and helped found the glass program there by 1985.  He has been honored with several prestigious awards, recognizing him for excellence in his contributions to art and teaching.

Source: Stephen Rolfe Powell.

Source: Stephen Rolfe Powell.

Source: Stephen Rolfe Powell.

Source: Stephen Rolfe Powell.

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2 thoughts on “9 Glass Artists With Remarkable Murrine And Cane Working Skills

  1. might you not need one more cane pulling artist to make this an even 10 check out Linda Perrin of Atlantic Art Glass for a peak at her innovative cane glass jewelry

    Like

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